Research

Evaluating Hadoop for Enterprise Big Data ETL

By Ajay Chandramouly, Aug 26, 2014

Like many leading IT organizations, my employer, Intel, has embraced the challenge of extracting business value from big data and turning the insights gained into a competitive advantage. Part of this challenge involves the process used to extract big data from multiple sources, then cleanse, format, and load it into a data warehouse for analysis, a process known as ETL (extract, transform, and load). But the conventional wisdom around ETL is shifting.

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Plan for Big Data Like It’s 2000

By Thomas H. Davenport, Aug 21, 2014

What kinds of activities and decisions should a company pursue as it wrestles with its big data strategy? I see two major decisions at first, and then several others that follow from them. I’ll use Monsanto as an example, since it is a company that is clearly moving from being a provider of seeds and herbicides to one that provides data and analytics-based products and services.

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This powerpoint presentation is the companion to the DELTA series phone briefing led by Lee Pierce, AVP of Analytics and BI at Intermountain Healthcare. Lee shares the strategy and approach that Intermountain Healthcare has adopted to integrate their successful traditional analytics practices and their Big Data analytics practices.

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What Works in Data Management: Data Management Success in the Era of Big Data

By IIA Faculty, Aug 15, 2014

Available to ERS Clients and Professional Members

With the exponential growth in data volumes, sources, and systems, businesses are facing a myriad of challenges managing data. Organizations are quickly realizing that what may have worked in the past is no longer suitable; users have become more sophisticated and there is an expectation that data will be readily available in a variety of formats so as to make informed decisions. While the challenge and risk to manage data effectively is high, there is huge opportunity and the returns can be significant.

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Many organizations fall victim to what I’m about to discuss and a fundamental shift in how organizations think about and fund analytics is required to address it. Today, the systems used to facilitate analytics within most organizations are owned by IT, which means that IT owns the budget to purchase and maintain the systems

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Corporate Real Estate Analytics Part II

By John Serri, Aug 13, 2014

Available to ERS Clients only

Some corporations by nature of their core business have a more analytics-based-tradition than others. While the large fiscal and functional footprint of Corporate Real Estate is well known, and the analytics tools and skills are available, adoption has been slow. What are the barriers that are hampering adoption of analytics? How can adoption be accelerated? In this respect, we briefly examine the roles and responsibilities of those involved with managing CRE.

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Eyes Wide Open: Open Source Analytics Software

By David Macdonald, Aug 11, 2014

Available to ERS Clients only

Across a broad spectrum of information technology projects, the primary cost drivers have traditionally fallen into three categories: hardware, software and people. In a similar way, the costs of assembling the technology and expertise necessary for a robust analytics ecosystem inside your enterprise will fall into these same categories. The unique feature of a data and analytics program, however, is the growing cost of supporting end-users who are playing the largest role in how analytical answers are generated for complex business problems. The human capital costs are not simply confined to IT.

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Who Owns Your Data Exhaust?

By Thomas H. Davenport, Aug 07, 2014

More than twenty years ago, consultants Stan Davis and Bill Davidson, in the book 2020 Vision, argued that a company’s “information exhaust” (information byproducts gathered in the course of its normal business) could be used to “informationalize” a business (develop products and services based on information) and turbocharge its performance. Their primary examples of this phenomenon were information companies—Quotron, TV Guide, TRW, and the like. They did argue, however, that any company in any industry had the potential to be informationalized by its data exhaust.

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Analytic Relevance in the Healthcare Workforce

By Mark Dobeck, Jul 30, 2014

US colleges and universities must recognize their critical role in the local business ecosystem by not only understanding but anticipating the future needs and workforce skills that will be in-demand by the local business community. Business Analytics is acquiring an increasingly significant and strategic role in business, particularly in the healthcare field. Effective and accessible educational programs must subsequently be developed to teach and train the next generation of knowledge workers to be proficient in business analytics. Now is the time to evolve in order to develop an accurate and cross disciplinary analytics skillset profile for the healthcare industry.

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Intermountain Healthcare is an integrated health system, dedicated to advancing the power of analytics for clinical care. As a new era of analytics emerges, Intermountain plans to advance its mission to provide the best quality care at the lowest appropriate cost by continuing to advance and leverage analytics for better business and clinical decisions.

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